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In Depth Articles

Teenagers, smart phones and ADHD

July 17, 2018

Teenagers who are constantly checking their phones are more likely to develop ADHD symptoms than their less social-media-engaged peers, US researchers say.
In what the study authors say is the first longitudinal study investigating the issue, researchers found that the frequency of digital media use among over 2500 non-ADHD 15-and 16-year-olds …

Diagnosed with hypertension? Think aldosteronism

All newly-diagnosed hypertensive patients should be screened for primary aldosteronism before they are started on treatment, Australian experts suggest in the latest issue of the MJA.
“Primary aldosteronism is common, specifically treatable, and associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality,” say researchers Dr Jun Yang, Professor Peter Fuller and Professor Michael …

The link between sebaceous gland tumours and colon cancer.

July 11, 2018

A case report
A 56-year-old patient presents with a smooth, round, slightly scaly lump on the forehead, 2mm in maximum dimension. The clinical diagnosis was query basal cell carcinoma and it was excised.
Microscopic findings were of sebaceoma and following immunohistochemistry staining shows loss of nuclear positivity of the DNA mismatch …

Introducing solids early helps babies sleep.

New study findings confirm what many parents already believe, introducing solids early helps babies sleep through the night.
The UK randomised trial, published in JAMA Pediatrics showed the early introduction of solids into an infant’s diet (from three months of age) was associated with longer sleep duration, less frequent waking at …

Patients Okay with Doctor Tattoos

July 04, 2018

Findings from a newly published study are likely to silence those who suggest doctors need to return to wearing white coats to improve patient respect.
According to US researchers, patient perception in terms of a doctor’s capability, trustworthiness and reliability is not affected by the presence of visible tattoos and non-traditional …

Can meditation really slow ageing?

Is there real science in the spiritualism of meditation? Jo Marchant meets a Nobel Prize-winner who thinks so.
It’s seven in the morning on the beach in Santa Monica, California. The low sun glints off the waves and the clouds are still golden from the dawn. The view stretches out over …

Using HbA1c Wisely

June 27, 2018

Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) has been used for monitoring patients with established diabetes for many years but its diagnostic application is a more recent development. This article provides some background to the test, explains dual reporting of results and discusses the use of HbA1c in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes.
What …

Managing Heavy Menstrual Bleeding in General Practice

Based on an interview with Associate Professor Kirsten Black and Clinical Associate Professor Deborah Bateson conducted at the Annual Women’s and Children’s Health Update, Sydney in February 2018.
“Heavy menstrual bleeding” is the new term for menorrhagia.
This under-treated condition is easy to screen for in general practice. And screening for it …

Managing Hyperhidrosis

June 20, 2018

Based on an interview with Sydney dermatologist, Dr Rob Rosen conducted at the Annual Women’s and Children’s Health Update, Sydney in February 2018.
Hyperhidrosis is a very distressing condition that equally affects both men and women, across all ethnicities.  It occurs in approximately 3% of the general population and the onset …

Time Is Running Out to Contain Gonorrhoea

Mark King has had the clap so many times he’s renamed it ‘the applause’. The first time King had gonorrhoea, he was a teenager in the late 1970s, growing up with his five siblings in Louisiana.
He had the telltale signs: burning and discomfort when he urinated and a thick discharge that …

What Is Lymphocytic Oesophagitis

June 13, 2018

The importance of eosinophils and neutrophils infiltrating oesophageal squamous epithelium as markers for reflux, eosinophilic oesophagitis, and infection are well entrenched, although traditionally less attention has been paid to lymphocytes.
Small numbers of lymphocytes are normally seen in oesophageal epithelium including CD4 helper and CD8 positive cytotoxic lymphocytes.
However, isolated increases in …

Caring for elderly Australians in a home-like setting can reduce hospital visits

A new study out today has found residents with dementia in aged-care facilities that provide a home-like model of care have a better quality of life and fewer hospitalisations than those living in more standard facilities. We also found the benefits of a home-like model were provided without an increase …

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