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Study highlights need for strength training in older women to ward off effects of aging

May 23, 2018

Regular physical activity may help older women increase their mobility, but muscle strength and endurance are likely to succumb to the effects of frailty if they haven’t also been doing resistance training.
That is according to the findings of a cross-sectional study led by the University at Buffalo and published in …

Soccer heading-not collisions-cognitively impairs players

Worse cognitive function in soccer players stems mainly from frequent ball heading rather than unintentional head impacts due to collisions, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine have found. The findings suggest that efforts to reduce long-term brain injuries may be focusing too narrowly on preventing accidental head collisions. The study published …

Some women feel grief after an abortion, but there’s no evidence of serious mental health issues

This week, the website Mamamia published, and then quickly removed, an article about the existence of “post-abortion syndrome” – a disorder apparently experienced by many women who have had an abortion. The article claimed this disorder has been concealed from the public and that the trauma of an induced abortion …

Mental, not physical, fatigue affects seniors’ walking ability

May 16, 2018

Low “mental energy” may affect walking patterns in older adults more than physical fatigue. New research about the relationship between walking ability and self-reported mood will be presented today at the American Physiological Society (APS) annual meeting at Experimental Biology 2018 in San Diego.
Researchers from Clarkson University in New York …

Why genetics makes some people more vulnerable to opioid addiction – and protects others

Every day, 91 Americans die from an opioid overdose. Rates of abuse of these drugs have shot up over the past 15 years and continue to climb.
Why is this happening? Is there hope for helping individuals with opioid addiction?
From a scientific standpoint, addiction is a disease. And, as researchers who …

Bias and Discrimination Keep Women With Higher Body Weights Away from the Doctor

A study out of Drexel University’s Dornsife School of Public Health linked past experiences with bias and discrimination and avoidance of doctors in women with higher body weights.
Most studies that look into body weight and its effect on healthcare visits don’t consider the experiences of weight stigma or patients’ feelings …

Every cancer patient should be prescribed exercise medicine

May 09, 2018

Every four minutes someone in Australia is diagnosed with cancer. Only one in ten of those diagnosed will exercise enough during and after their treatment. But every one of those patients would benefit from exercise.
I’m part of Australia’s peak body representing health professionals who treat people with cancer, the Clinical …

What if You Could Know That Your Mild Cognitive Impairment Wouldn’t Progress in the Next Decade Through the Result of Two Simple Neuropsychological Tests?

Researchers from the Lisbon School of Medicine, University of Lisbon found that, in some mild cognitive impairment patients, real neuropsychological stability over a decade is possible and that long-term stability could be predicted based on neuropsychological tests measuring memory and non-verbal abstract reasoning, according to a study published in the …

Preconception zinc deficiency could spell bad news for fertility

An estimated 10 percent of couples in the U.S. struggle with infertility. While a variety of factors can make it difficult for some people to get pregnant, ovulation disorders are a leading cause of female infertility. Now, researchers at Pennsylvania State University have found that zinc deficiency can negatively affect …

Commonly prescribed heartburn drug linked to Pneumonia in Older Adults

May 02, 2018

Researchers at the University of Exeter have found a statistical link between pneumonia in older people and a group of medicines commonly used to neutralise stomach acid in people with heartburn or stomach ulcers.
Although Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are still a valuable group of medicines, research is indicating that PPIs are not as …

Female doctors show more empathy, but at a cost to their mental well-being

Female doctors show more empathy than male doctors. They ask their patients more questions, including questions about emotions and feelings, and they spend more time talking to patients than their male colleagues do. Some have suggested that this might make women better doctors. It may also take a terrible toll …

Legal highs: arguments for and against legalising cannabis in Australia

Greens leader Richard Di Natale wants Australia to legalise cannabis for personal use, regulated by a federal agency. This proposal is for legalisation of recreational use for relaxation and pleasure, not to treat a medical condition (which is already legal in Australia for some conditions).
According to the proposal, the government …

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