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More research needed into ‘unpleasant’ meditation experiences

May 15, 2019

A recent study has found that over one quarter of regular practitioners of meditation have experienced unpleasant psychological experiences as a result, indicating a need for further research into the potential negative effects of meditation.
The study, led by University College of London researchers and published in PLOS One, asked participants …

Does insulin resistance cause fibromyalgia?

May 08, 2019

Researchers led by a team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston were able to dramatically reduce the pain of fibromyalgia patients with medication that targeted insulin resistance.
This discovery could dramatically alter the way that chronic pain can be identified and managed. Dr. Miguel Pappolla, UTMB professor of …

UK law on medicinal cannabis changed six months ago – what have we learned?

On November 1, 2018, the UK changed the law on medicinal cannabis. Medicinal cannabis products were moved from schedule 1, meaning they have no medicinal value, to schedule 2, which allowed doctors to prescribe them under certain circumstances. This change to the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 was partly a …

Sunscreen chemicals enter bloodstream at potentially unsafe levels: study

For years, you’ve been urged to slather on sunscreen before venturing outdoors. But new U.S. Food and Drug Administration data reveals chemicals in sunscreens are absorbed into the human body at levels high enough to raise concerns about potentially toxic effects.
Bloodstream levels of four sunscreen chemicals increased dramatically after test …

Urine test could prevent cervical cancer

April 30, 2019

Urine testing may be as effective as the smear test at preventing cervical cancer, according to new research by University of Manchester scientists.
The study, led by Dr. Emma Crosbie and published in BMJ Open, found that urine testing was just as good as the cervical smear at picking up high-risk …

Biomarker for chronic fatigue syndrome identified

People suffering from a debilitating and often discounted disease known as chronic fatigue syndrome may soon have something they’ve been seeking for decades: scientific proof of their ailment.
Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine have created a blood test that can flag the disease, which currently lacks a standard, …

Breastfeeding reduces child obesity risk by up to 25%, WHO finds

Breastfeeding can cut the chances of a child becoming obese by up to 25%, according to a major study involving 16 countries.
World Health Organisation (WHO) experts who led the Europe-wide research are calling for more help and encouragement to women to breastfeed, as well as curbs on the marketing of …

When science is put in the service of evil

April 24, 2019

The Holocaust is one of the worst collective crimes in the history of humanity – and medical science was complicit in the horrors.
After World War II, evidence was given at the Nuremberg Trials of reprehensible research carried out on humans. This includes subjects being frozen, infected with tuberculosis, or having …

Psychedelics to treat mental illness? Australian researchers are giving it a go

An estimated one in ten Australians were taking antidepressants in 2015. That’s double the number using them in 2000, and the second-highest rate of antidepressant use among all OECD countries.
Yet some studies have found antidepressants might be no more effective than placebo.
Not only does this mean many Australians aren’t experiencing …

American pharmaceutical company set to trial cannabis-derived drug on diabetics in Vanuatu

An American company has opted to trial a new experimental cannabis-derived drug on diabetics in Vanuatu as a result of stringent Federal laws preventing the trial in the United States, according to the company’s chief executive.
The company, Phoenix Life Sciences International, was headquartered in the US state of Colorado but …

Healthy hearts need two proteins working together

April 17, 2019

Two proteins that bind to stress hormones work together to maintain a healthy heart in mice, according to scientists at the National Institutes of Health and their collaborators. These proteins, stress hormone receptors known as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), act in concert to help support heart …

Alzheimer’s: Synthetic protein blocks toxic beta-amyloid

Alzheimer’s is a relentless disease in which toxic clusters of beta-amyloid protein collect in brain cells. Now, scientists have designed a synthetic peptide, or small protein, that can block beta-amyloid in its early and most harmful stages.
The synthetic peptide, which has only 23 amino acids, folds into structures called alpha …