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Healthed webcasts are a valuable educational platform, allowing viewers to gain up-to-date clinical knowledge through an easy, time-efficient format. Our free web-based seminars fill a huge unmet need amongst GPs outside of the major cities for quality, accessible education. Every Healthed webcast features at least three expert lectures and runs for at least 90 minutes. While the majority of our viewers are General Practitioners, our webcasts are also drawing growing interest from other HCPs, such as pharmacists and nurses. Registrants can watch stream the webcast on a computer, tablet or phone. Instructions on how to log in to the webcast will be emailed to registered delegates in the weeks before the event.

Healthed Webcast

11

May, 2021



6:30 pm - 9:00 pm | AEST


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Topics & Speaker

An Update on Hypogonadism and Testosterone Replacement

Prof Robert McLachlan AM

Physician-Scientist; Medical Director, Healthy Male; Director of Andrology Services, Hudson Institute of Medical Research; Consultant Andrologist, Monash IVF Group

Professor Robert McLachlan AM is a physician-scientist and Principal Research Fellow with a programme of basic and clinical research in male reproductive health. He joined the Prince Henry’s Institute, now Hudson Institute of Medical Research, in 1983. He is Medical Director at Healthy Male and Deputy Director of Endocrinology at Monash Medical Centre, Consultant Andrologist to the Monash IVF program, consultant to the WHO and is the Director of Andrology Australia, a Federal Government initiative committed to research and community & professional education in male reproductive health. Prof McLachlan has made major contributions to scientific discovery, translation into clinical practice and education in male reproductive health. His particular interests are male fertility regulation, the genetics of male infertility and androgen physiology.
Topic Summary
Male hypogonadism, caused by intrinsic pathology of the hypothalamic–pituitary–testicular (HPT) axis, is an under-diagnosed condition not to be missed. By contrast, late onset hypogonadism (LOH), due to functional suppression of the HPT axis from age-related comorbidities, may be less common than previously believed. Prof McLachlan will provide an update on current evidence, appropriate testing, which patients should be managed with Testosterone supplementation and which by lifestyle modification alone. An overview of current Testosterone delivery options – cream, gel, patch or injection and which option suits which patient will also be covered.

Update on Safety and Adverse Effects of the COVID Vaccines Being Used in Australia

Prof Kristine Macartney

Professor, Paediatrics & Child Health, Children's Hospital, Westmead, Vaccinologist, Director, National Centre for Immunisation Research & Surveillance (NCIRS)

Professor Kristine Macartney is a paediatrician specialising in infectious diseases and vaccinology. She is a medical graduate of the University of New South Wales and undertook her specialty training in Sydney and in the United States at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Her Doctorate of Medicine was on rotavirus infection, in particular the mucosal immune response to novel vaccine candidates. She was a foundational member of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. Kristine is currently the Director of the National Centre for Immunisation Research and Surveillance (NCIRS), a paediatric infectious disease consultant at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead and a Professor in the Discipline of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Sydney. Her research interests include translation of evidence into policy and practice, vaccine safety, and most other areas of vaccine preventable diseases research, particularly in relation to rotavirus, varicella zoster virus and influenza. She is the senior editor of the Australian Immunisation Handbook (9th and10th Editions and online) and has authored >130 peer-reviewed publications. She is a member of the Advisory Committee on Vaccines (ACV) of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), the Communicable Diseases Network of Australia (CDNA) and the Australian Technical Advisory Group on Immunisation (ATAGI). She has acted as an expert consultant to the World Health Organisation (WHO). She also leads the Australian national AusVaxSafety and Paediatric Active Enhanced Disease Surveillance (PAEDS) networks, and is the founding chair of the Australian Regional Immunisation Alliance (ARIA).
Topic Summary
As the information about clots and other risks develop, there are new guidelines, indications, and patient information that immunisers need to get up to speed on. The situation is very fluid and this lecture is the latest authoritative update available on this and other related issues.

Depression in Men – Practical Advice

Prof David Castle

Psychiatrist; Inaugural Scientific Director, Centre for Complex Interventions (CCI) at the Centre for Addictions and Mental Health (CAMH), Toronto, Canada; Professor, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Toronto
Honorary Affiliation - Professor of Psychiatry at St Vincent’s Health and The University of Melbourne

David is Professor of Psychiatry at St Vincent’s Health and The University of Melbourne. He has wide clinical and research interests, encompassing schizophrenia and related disorders, bipolar disorder, OCD spectrum disorders and disorders of body image. He has a longstanding interest in the impact of licit and illicit substances on the brain and body and is actively engaged in programmes addressing the physical health of the mentally ill and the mental health of the physically ill. He has published widely in the scientific literature and is a frequent speaker at scientific meetings.
Topic Summary
Mood disorders in men are less common than in women, but keep this diagnosis in mind if behaviour is becoming violent. Allowing men to express their emotional pain and marshalling support, offering helplines, support groups all help. Pay attention to longitudinal history when differentiating depression from bipolar disorder, and if you suspect this, avoid prescribing SNRIs and tricyclics. When the patient cannot see the pain they will cause when they die by suicide, we may have to take active measures even against the patient's will.

PSA Testing – An Update on Best Practice

A/Prof Jeremy Grummet

Urological Surgeon; Advisor, Healthy Male; Director, Clinical Research in Urology, Alfred Health; Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Surgery, Monash University; Co-Founder, MRI PRO

Assoc Prof Jeremy Grummet is a urological surgeon with specific training and expertise in urological cancers. He performs MRI-targeted transperineal biopsy for maximal accuracy and minimal risk in prostate cancer diagnosis. Assoc Prof Grummet also performs both robotic and open radical prostatectomy for the treatment of prostate cancer and is trained in brachytherapy (radioactive seed implantation). He performs laparoscopic (keyhole) surgery for kidney cancer and radical cystectomy (bladder removal) for locally aggressive bladder cancer. He has presented widely at multiple national and international conferences on the benefits of surgery for high risk localised prostate cancer, and is a strong advocate of active surveillance for low risk prostate cancer to minimise unnecessary treatment. He is an Adviser at Healthy Male and is also a site investigator at Alfred Health on the PRIAS study, the largest worldwide study assessing outcomes for patients on active surveillance.
Topic Summary
PSA testing continues to be a topic that is a cause of debate and sometimes confusion about which men should be tested and how the results should be interpreted and acted upon. We will look at the latest advice on how best to use this test in primary care, and how to explain the test to patients. This talk will also look at new and emerging ideas in assessing prostate cancer risk including prostate MRI and other serum markers.

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