Low flavonoid intake associated with up to four times higher Alzheimer’s risk

Low flavonoid intake associated with up to four times higher Alzheimer’s risk

A recently published longitudinal study has provided strong new evidence linking sustained low intake of flavonoids to significantly increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

The study was conducted by a team of US researchers over the course of nearly twenty years, measuring the flavonoid intake of the 2,801 participants using dietary questionnaires every four years.

The results showed a strong association between low flavonoid consumption and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias (ADRD), although interestingly not all flavonoids seemed to provide the same benefits. Low intake of flavonols and flavonoid polymers (found in apples, pears, and tea) was associated with a twice the risk of developing ADRD, whereas low intake of anthocyanins (blueberries, ...

Reference

Jacques PF, Au R, Blumberg JB, Rogers GT, Shistar E. Long-term dietary flavonoid intake and risk of Alzheimer disease and related dementias in the Framingham Offspring Cohort. Am J Clin Nutr. 2020 Apr 22; nqaa079. DOI: 10.1093/ajcn/nqaa079

Send this to a friend