Hot Topics Webcast

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Hot Topics Webcast

25

Aug, 2020



6:30 pm - 9:00 pm | AEST


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Topics & Speaker

Childhood and Adolescent Obesity – Management From a GP Perspective

Dr Shirley Alexander

Dr Shirley Alexander

Dr Shirley Alexander has practiced as a paediatrician in the UK and Australia for over 20 years. Over the past 10 years, she has been working as Staff Specialist and is the Head of Weight Management Services at the Children's Hospital at Westmead (CHW), a multidisciplinary team helping children and young people with obesity and their families develop healthier lifestyle habits. She has published broadly on topics in relation to childhood obesity and medical education and has presented at conferences locally, nationally and internationally. In addition, Shirley has a strong focus in medical education with appointments through the University of Notre Dame, Clinical Lead in Paediatrics for the Sydney Medical School (Auburn) and as Director of Prevocational Education and Training at CHW.
Topic summary
Children who have obesity are more likely to become adults with obesity.  If children have obesity, their obesity and disease risk factors in adulthood are likely to be more severe. Managing obesity in children involves a whole family approach with a strong focus on dietary habits and other healthy lifestyle habits. Strategies to discuss obesity issues with parents and children are also an important part of the strategy.

But What About Food?  Dietary Changes for Weight Management

Alicia Grunseit

Alicia is an Accredited Practising Dietitian with many years of experience in both Paediatrics and Adult Nutrition. Alicia is Senior Weight Management Dietitian at the Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, The Children's Hospital at Westmead
Topic summary
Children who have obesity are more likely to become adults with obesity.  If children have obesity, their obesity and disease risk factors in adulthood are likely to be more severe. Managing obesity in children involves a whole family approach with a strong focus on dietary habits and other healthy lifestyle habits. Strategies to discuss obesity issues with parents and children are also an important part of the strategy.

Obesity Management in Young Adults

A/Prof Samantha Hocking

Endocrinologist; Royal Prince Alfred Hospital; Clinical Academic at Charles Perkins Research Centre, University of Sydney

A/Prof Samantha Hocking is an Endocrinologist at the Royal Prince Alfred Hospital and a Clinical Academic at the University of Sydney. Samantha’s main research interest is precision medicine – exploring how personalised medicine can both predict, prevent and improve the management of metabolic disease, particularly diabetes. In addition, she is working with fellow researchers at The Boden Institute and the CPC-RPA Clinic on projects in obesity, bariatric surgery, metabolic syndrome and diabetes and liver disease.
Topic summary
Young adults – especially those who are already overweight – experience the highest rate of weight gain of any age group, further increasing cardiometabolic risk. Interventions need to be adapted and designed specifically for this age group. Strategies should include technology, flexible scheduling, an emphasis on ‘fitness’ rather than ‘weight loss’ and engagement with peers or groups rather than individuals. Pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery are also options to consider as part of an integrated approach.

Early Life Solutions to the Modern Health Crisis

Prof Susan Prescott

Prof Susan Prescott

Susan Prescott is the Winthrop Professor in the School of Paediatrics and Child Health at University of Western Australia. She is also a Paediatric Allergist and Immunologist at the Perth Children’s Hospital and a Research Strategy Leader and the Telethon KIDS Institute. She is founding President of the multidisciplinary ‘DOHaD’ Society in Australia and New Zealand (Developmental Origins of Health and Disease) and is a Director of the World Allergy Organisation, the peak global organisation on allergy, comprising of over 90 national and regional allergy and immunology societies.
Topic summary
Obesity risk, and in fact the risk for most of the common non-communicable diseases, begins at conception, and even before that, with the health of the parents. Factors that occur at critical stages of our development can have a far more profound effect on health than the same exposure later in life. This also means that to truly overcome the rising rates of modern disease, of which obesity is a major example, we must target prevention from the first moments of life. In this context there is now substantial evidence that initiatives to promote a healthy start to life can reduce the risk of both early and later chronic disease, including obesity.

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