Clinical Conversations: Myasthenia Gravis – A Practical Approach for GPs | Part three

Clinical Conversations: Myasthenia Gravis – A Practical Approach for GPs | Part three

 

This article about myasthenia gravis highlights the central role GPs have in the diagnosis and ongoing management of patients with this rare condition. This is part three of a three-part article.

This is part three of this series.
Read Part 1 >>
Read Part 2 >>

Practice points
• Patients need to continue keeping active; they will feel fatigued and it will be hard, because this is a condition that is exacerbated by more activity and it’s important to not misinterpret fatigue as worsening myasthenia weakness.

• It is extremely difficult to differentiate therapy-related side-effects from an adjustment disorder due to an initial diagnosis of myasthenia gravis. Mental health problems are common in our society.

• Replace what vitamins and minerals you are depleted in. If you are already replete, then the indication is not strong for supplementation.

• Myasthenia Gravis Patient Association groups are excellent to refer patients to.

DL
Briefly, how could a GP differentiate myasthenia gravis, motor neurone disease and multiple sclerosis?

FC
Number one, those are quite different conditions. One is a neuromuscular junction disorder, one is an anterior horn cell disorder and one is a disorder purely of the central nervous system. There is no hard and fast rules, but medicine begins in ...

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